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Heartworm Medications

 

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Most dogs with epilepsy don't have problems with heartworm preventatives.  However, a few patients seem to be more likely to suffer seizures soon after the administration of a particular preventative.  In these cases, it is recommended that they switch to a different product.   There isn't one heartworm preventative that's better or worse for dogs with epilepsy and the incidence of seizures is low for all of them.  (Please see note on Proheart 6).

The exception to this may be with collies because some collies (not all) have a genetic deficiency in a protein associated with the blood-brain barrier.  This allows Ivermectin to enter the brain from the blood.  Sensitivity to Ivermectin has also been noted in other herding breeds.

Proheart 6 Injectable:  Since this drug is still very new, I would avoid using it on an epileptic dog.  The following excerpt is from Fort Dodge's website:

ADVERSE REACTIONS:

In field studies, the following adverse reactions were observed in approximately 1% of 280 dogs treated with ProHeart 6: 

vomiting, diarrhea, listlessness, weight loss, seizures, injection site pruritus, and elevated body temperature.

Post-Approval Experience: Although not all adverse reactions are reported, the following reactions are based on voluntary post-approval drug experience reporting: anaphylaxis, depression, lethargy, urticaria, and head facial edema.  To report suspected adverse reactions or to obtain technical assistance, call (800) 533-8536.

 

Site Map

Home

Primary Epilepsy

Epilepsy Meds and treatments

Secondary Epilepsy

Diet and  Supplements

Common Concerns

 

FAQ'S

 

What Can I do

My Beagles

Radar's Triumph

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Last Updated August 2009